Posted 5 hours ago
Posted 5 hours ago
Posted 6 hours ago

spaghettiseven:

flies to 3 different countries in 3 mins

Posted 7 hours ago

tittily:

my little cousin got bit by a house spider and she was crying so i went to get some stuff to soothe and numb it but before i could even walk out the door i heard her quietly whisper ‘i can’t handle the responsibility of being spiderman’

Posted 8 hours ago
Posted 9 hours ago
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Posted 11 hours ago
What's the word for the type of gray when the lights are turned off?
Anonymous asked

word-stuck:

Eigengrau (“intrinsic gray” / “own grey”), also called Eigenlicht (“intrinsic light”), dark light, or brain gray, is a term for the uniform dark gray background that many people report seeing in the absence of light. It is the dark grey colour seen by the eyes in perfect darkness, as a result of signals from the optic nerves.

Even in the absence of light, some action potentials are still sent along the optic nerve, causing the sensation of a uniform dark gray color. Eigengrau is perceived as lighter than a black object in normal lighting conditions, because contrast is more important to the visual system than absolute brightness.

Hence, what we see in the dark is not black (000000), but the color eigengrau (16161D hex or 22,22,29 RGB).

image

Opps… wrong photo :/

image

Posted 12 hours ago

thequeen117:

Some links I have found in various Tumblr Posts that I have saved on my computer. I do not take credit for collecting all these links. Unfortunately, I did not have the mind to save/note where these various links come from. Thank you to whoever compiled these links together.

General Writing Tips, Guides and Advice

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Start Your Novel Already!
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Posted 13 hours ago
Posted 1 day ago

maxineanwaar:

A 14-year old Yazidi girl carrying an assault rifle to protect her family from IS, formerly ISIS.

Posted 1 day ago

lenorestreetgarden:

My sister’s terrarium garden is one of the loveliest things I’ve ever seen.

Photos by Heidi.

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago

foundersofhogwarts:

Aidan Gillen as Salazar Slytherin.

requested by anon

Posted 1 day ago

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

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